Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby MysticalDescent » Sat Feb 11, 2012 10:47 pm

I don't suppose this Luis Suarez thing has been in the news anywhere else? I'd have thought there might be some small mention of it somewhere, what with Liverpool's owners being American. I think they used to own the Red Sox?
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby chrismachine » Sun Feb 12, 2012 1:03 am

That's a pretty bad scene, even worse for it to take place in a country that has a bad rap (at least over here) for the racial stance of some of the population. I don't know how to say that in a better way, but it's simply to say it doesn't look good when there is already a perceived problem with race relations among the people that live there. I really seem to lack the words to say this properly; hopefully I didn't offend anyone...
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby ntw3001 » Sun Feb 12, 2012 2:05 am

Does the UK have a bad reputation for racism? It was really known for hooliganism in the eighties, but now it's actually pretty widely regarded as an example of how to get rid of that problem. Racism, there's certainly not been much of it in sports here for a long time as far as I can recall (a lot of other countries still have much bigger problems with both), but suddenly several events have happened at once. As well as Luis Suarez and John Terry, I think there have been other cases in the last month or two (can't think of any now). I guess it's an unfortunate sequence of unrelated events, because I'm not aaware of anything that ought to have caused any such tensions to flare up. Just in time for the Olympics!

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby jvcc » Sun Feb 12, 2012 2:23 am

ntw3001 wrote:Does the UK have a bad reputation for racism? It was really known for hooliganism in the eighties, but now it's actually pretty widely regarded as an example of how to get rid of that problem. Racism, there's certainly not been much of it in sports here for a long time as far as I can recall (a lot of other countries still have much bigger problems with both), but suddenly several events have happened at once. As well as Luis Suarez and John Terry, I think there have been other cases in the last month or two (can't think of any now). I guess it's an unfortunate sequence of unrelated events, because I'm not aaware of anything that ought to have caused any such tensions to flare up. Just in time for the Olympics!

Do you mean in regard to racism in sports scenarios or in general?

In general in America I'd say that the UK is known for the specificity of its racism: John Oliver had a bit on The Daily Show where he talked about how English racists are profoundly racist against other white people (e.g., the Welsh or the Irish). I know a bit about the difficulties encounter in the UK by people of Afro-Caribbean or South Asian descent because of people I've known and things that I've read. But I don't think that the British are considered particularly racist or more racist than Americans, for example. I could be wrong. Surprisingly, I'm not always in tune with popular opinion.
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby giantsfan97 » Sun Feb 12, 2012 2:59 am

sum yun gai wrote:but the fact that the guy who cost his team the chance to win (gronkowski) was partying it up and celebrating as though he actually won the game makes me severely suspicious of that dropped ball at the end. either he's a good on-field actor or he's a good off-field actor, i'm pretty sure he should not be quite so joyous at having blown his team's chance for victory.


Not sure I follow you, to what dropped ball are you referring? Welker had the big drop that cost the Patriots. I do find it interesting that Gronk could barely run around during the game but didn't have a problem dancing around afterwards on that high ankle sprain.
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby ntw3001 » Sun Feb 12, 2012 1:11 pm

jvcc wrote:
ntw3001 wrote:Does the UK have a bad reputation for racism? It was really known for hooliganism in the eighties, but now it's actually pretty widely regarded as an example of how to get rid of that problem. Racism, there's certainly not been much of it in sports here for a long time as far as I can recall (a lot of other countries still have much bigger problems with both), but suddenly several events have happened at once. As well as Luis Suarez and John Terry, I think there have been other cases in the last month or two (can't think of any now). I guess it's an unfortunate sequence of unrelated events, because I'm not aaware of anything that ought to have caused any such tensions to flare up. Just in time for the Olympics!

Do you mean in regard to racism in sports scenarios or in general?

In general in America I'd say that the UK is known for the specificity of its racism: John Oliver had a bit on The Daily Show where he talked about how English racists are profoundly racist against other white people (e.g., the Welsh or the Irish). I know a bit about the difficulties encounter in the UK by people of Afro-Caribbean or South Asian descent because of people I've known and things that I've read. But I don't think that the British are considered particularly racist or more racist than Americans, for example. I could be wrong. Surprisingly, I'm not always in tune with popular opinion.


I meant in general, but I ended up focusing on sports because I'm not that big on outside-sports racism. There's racial tension in some areas of course, but it's not something I've ever directly encountered. I'm just surprised to hear that it's sufficient to cause a reputation.

With regards to inter-European racism, I imagine it's just a question of acceptable targets. I've never encountered any prejudice between Western European countries that's any more caustic than what you see on the Simpsons. Of course there are issues due to the ease of immigration in the EU; one thing I've noticed in Toronto is that, while it's probably the most multicultural city I've been in, almost everyone speaks perfect English, and most people were either born in Canada or have been here for over a decade. In Europe, a huge number of people have moved West to find work (particularly to the UK, with hopes of later moving on to the US or Canada), don't speak the language of their new country, and many will never need to learn because the volume of immigration is sufficient for English to be unnecessary. The result is multiple communities whose only interaction is in competing for minimum-wage jobs, and of course that fosters particular resentment in the group of UK citizens who were there first. It's certainly true that nationalist politics are on the rise, though. The BNP aren't strong, but they're getting stronger, and I would guess that's probably the source of whatever reputation the country may have. I can't think of anything else; it's not as though the country is rife with radical nationalist groups. It's just the one political party with a 'send all the darkies back home' policy, and the continued existence of isolated racially-motivated crimes.

So yeah, there's the basic predictable result of free movement between economically and culturally diverse areas. But that's a general European issue; the declaration that 'multiculturalism has failed' has been made by both British and German leaders, referring to the plan of essentially separate, non-integrated communities coexisting side-by-side (again, apparently devised without noticing the essential job-competition interaction). And of course sporting racism is a high-profile issue, but in the UK it's the players, not the fans, who are the source of current attention. Racism from the stands is still a problem in other countries; England players have recieved abuse on their travels and Mario Balotelli has endured similar treatment playing for Italy to John Barnes for England in the 80s.

So, eh. While racism isn't stamped out by any means, the UK generally seems to have, at least, no greater problems than across Europe. In its most commonly visible form - in sports - it's now well above average and has been noted as such (in, for example, the failed World Cup bid). I can't speak about the struggles of Afro-Caribbean or South Asian people; I know those communities have problems, but I was under the impression the issues arose more from the natural difficulty of rising from the bottom of the economic pile than from any particular racist efforts. Again, not saying those tensions somehow don't exist, but I'd be surprised to find that racism is actually a significant element to the root problems those groups suffer. But then, I live (when in the UK) in a detached house featuring a garden pond with a bridge, so I'm not exactly in touch with these communities.

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby sum yun gai » Sun Feb 12, 2012 3:46 pm

giantsfan97 wrote:
sum yun gai wrote:but the fact that the guy who cost his team the chance to win (gronkowski) was partying it up and celebrating as though he actually won the game makes me severely suspicious of that dropped ball at the end. either he's a good on-field actor or he's a good off-field actor, i'm pretty sure he should not be quite so joyous at having blown his team's chance for victory.


Not sure I follow you, to what dropped ball are you referring? Welker had the big drop that cost the Patriots. I do find it interesting that Gronk could barely run around during the game but didn't have a problem dancing around afterwards on that high ankle sprain.


ah crap, you're right. shows how much i actually paid attention to what happened i suppose.... like i said, this was probably the least favored matchup for my own SB preferences and i only tuned in to the second half because the halftime score was so close.
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby jvcc » Sun Feb 12, 2012 4:14 pm

ntw3001 wrote:I meant in general, but I ended up focusing on sports because I'm not that big on outside-sports racism. There's racial tension in some areas of course, but it's not something I've ever directly encountered. I'm just surprised to hear that it's sufficient to cause a reputation.

If the UK has a reputation for anything in America it's classism over racism. I think that I've had two or three professors explicitly say that classism is the racism of the UK (meaning that your class issues are equivalent in significance and magnitude to our race issues). I think they were falling back on oversimplification in order to contextualize Britain for their students. With the economy being the way it is and the rhetoric of the one and ninety-nine percentages we may reconsider our self-definition as a classless society.

ntw3001 wrote:With regards to inter-European racism, I imagine it's just a question of acceptable targets. I've never encountered any prejudice between Western European countries that's any more caustic than what you see on the Simpsons. Of course there are issues due to the ease of immigration in the EU; one thing I've noticed in Toronto is that, while it's probably the most multicultural city I've been in, almost everyone speaks perfect English, and most people were either born in Canada or have been here for over a decade. In Europe, a huge number of people have moved West to find work (particularly to the UK, with hopes of later moving on to the US or Canada), don't speak the language of their new country, and many will never need to learn because the volume of immigration is sufficient for English to be unnecessary. The result is multiple communities whose only interaction is in competing for minimum-wage jobs, and of course that fosters particular resentment in the group of UK citizens who were there first. It's certainly true that nationalist politics are on the rise, though. The BNP aren't strong, but they're getting stronger, and I would guess that's probably the source of whatever reputation the country may have. I can't think of anything else; it's not as though the country is rife with radical nationalist groups. It's just the one political party with a 'send all the darkies back home' policy, and the continued existence of isolated racially-motivated crimes.

Oh yes, I've heard of the BNP; Charlie Brooker made a mockery of them for saying that "Christmas is a British thing". I just equated them with our Tea Party Movement, or our more right-wing conservatives. Some specific authors I've read have discussed racial issues in the UK, like the poet Daljit Nagra.

This is completely tangential, but my teacher told me to email him about an old poem of his that I couldn't find anywhere. He responded and said that unfortunately he hadn't kept a record of it. I eventually found it in an obscure anthology of British South Asian writers and emailed it to him. He was appreciative. I had never really had any sort of exchange with a published author of literature before. It was exciting. Anyway, his poetry can be difficult to get into because he uses multiple forms, including dialect, but I think that he's able to address the complexity of issues like racial tension or the question of national identity without simplifying them or merely spouting the rhetoric of liberal multiculturalism.

What were we talking about--oh yes, large immigrant groups that speak little or no English. We get similar things in the US, or at least where I've been in the US.

ntw3001 wrote:So yeah, there's the basic predictable result of free movement between economically and culturally diverse areas. But that's a general European issue; the declaration that 'multiculturalism has failed' has been made by both British and German leaders, referring to the plan of essentially separate, non-integrated communities coexisting side-by-side (again, apparently devised without noticing the essential job-competition interaction). And of course sporting racism is a high-profile issue, but in the UK it's the players, not the fans, who are the source of current attention. Racism from the stands is still a problem in other countries; England players have received abuse on their travels and Mario Balotelli has endured similar treatment playing for Italy to John Barnes for England in the 80s.

Do people listen to what footballers say or care what they do? They might, but my essential argument would be that they probably shouldn't.

ntw3001 wrote:So, eh. While racism isn't stamped out by any means, the UK generally seems to have, at least, no greater problems than across Europe. In its most commonly visible form - in sports - it's now well above average and has been noted as such (in, for example, the failed World Cup bid). I can't speak about the struggles of Afro-Caribbean or South Asian people; I know those communities have problems, but I was under the impression the issues arose more from the natural difficulty of rising from the bottom of the economic pile than from any particular racist efforts. Again, not saying those tensions somehow don't exist, but I'd be surprised to find that racism is actually a significant element to the root problems those groups suffer. But then, I live (when in the UK) in a detached house featuring a garden pond with a bridge, so I'm not exactly in touch with these communities.

I was only comparing my knowledge and conceptions of race relations in Britain to those in the US; I know next to nothing about any other European countries.

Actually, one of Nagra's poems address racism and sports specifically. He's in a pub watching a football match and cheering with everyone for the English team, and he uses this as a basis for considering questions of belonging to a particular group of community. He also has another poem, not sports-related, where he (or the speaker rather--I assume he's speaking of himself, but author and speaker are not synonymous) is on the tube getting racial epithets thrown at him by some yobbos, as he calls them. My summaries of his poems aren't doing them justice, but if you like poetry and are interested in these questions you should get a hold of his collection Look We Have Coming to Dover!. It led to him being hailed as the poetic voice of British South Asian people, which I imagine is something he would be uncomfortable with (given what I can glean of his politics and opinions from his work).

Regarding Afro-Caribbean people or people of Afro-Caribbean descent in the UK, one of my professors at my old community college (who is now the Dean) was British and her grandfather was from the Caribbean. She talked a bit about the race-related difficulties that he and her parents faced, and about being the only black student in her high school. She also had us read Small Island, which was also adapted for television by the BBC, I believe. The lead actress is in was also in 28 Days Later, and she's quite good in both.

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby chrismachine » Sun Feb 12, 2012 8:57 pm

Well I've heard many times about people in England having less progressive views about people coming in from other countries and "taking their jobs that are meant for real English workers". Am I certain of it, of course not, but I'm only going on what I've heard from people who taught there or lived there, from the news, videos of classless (in terms of not being classy, not low-income) individuals screaming at black people on the subway, etc.
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby jvcc » Sun Feb 12, 2012 9:33 pm

Interesting.

In the spirit of broadening the scope of this discussion, I've generally heard that Canada is more inclusive than America when it comes to other cultures or races, particularly in large cities.
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby chrismachine » Sun Feb 12, 2012 11:38 pm

Despite NT's previous comment, it is thought that English is the second most prominent language in Toronto after Chinese. Anyway we are generally very open to immigration and different cultures in my experience, but the economic stuff allowed some of the anti-immigration people a bit of a voice because some of what they were saying about taking jobs away could almost be seen to have been happening (at least by those that felt that was part of the cause, anyway). Like everywhere else, once there is a crunch for space you either get very comfortable with your closeness (proximity) to other cultures, or very hateful and spiteful/resentful of them. We seem luckily to have had the former happen for the most part.
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby ntw3001 » Mon Feb 13, 2012 12:52 am

I've noticed the large Chinese-speaking population in Toronto, but I don't really know what to make of it. It seems like a pretty insular community and I don't really know what kind of jobs they take; my encounters have been with either landlords (really, the vast majority of landlords seem to be Chinese) or people living in outlandishly large houses when I was knocking on doors in North York. So I have no idea whether that community is generally middle-class and above or equally represented across the economic scale. If it's generally more wealthy, I'd expect the problem of resentment to be alleviated, but if not I don't know. All the places I've worked so far have required fluent English, so I haven't had any chance to understand how a non-English speaker gets by. There's Chinatown, but I certainly don't imagine that area supplies more than a fraction of the total jobs taken by Chinese speakers.

Of course, the lack of interaction I've had may mean that the Chinese community, as well as being well-established, is largely self-sufficient. And if a community manges to employ itss own members rather than competing with other communities for a shared pool of jobs, that's another potential explanation for the relative racial harmony in the city. Whether that's the case, again I don't know. I'm just making guesses here.

Anyway, competition for jobs from foreign workers is a big issue in the UK. Jobs are limited and recent immigration policies have been perhaps a touch over-generous. I don't know about being 'meant for English workers', but it's true that jobs are taken. So while that issue is there, I suppose it's less a general dislike of them brown folk than resentment towards immigrants in general based on a genuine economic problem. Feel free to differentiate between different types racism as you wish. Canada is, I hear, a whole bunch harder to get into, and that probably goes a long way towards good racial relations. It seems that national communities are less insular here (or at least, if there's some underground 'British community', I haven't been invited).

Maybe it's an issue of national identity too; there are maple leaves everywhere here, whereas in the UK flying flags is seen as rather shamefully nationalist. I guess it's some grave political fear that encouraging British national identity might make foreign residents feel gravely discriminated against, but it actually seems to result in a complete absence of motivation for immigrant communities to become integrated. Politicians seemed to pick up on this a few years ago, but I'm not sure what their strategy was for actually solving it. I know they introduced 'citizenship' as a subject at school, but that was a clear replacement for the pointless 'general studies' class (which, probably due to deep-rooted problems with the UK education system, no school ever took seriously and students were largely expected to treat as a free period).

That said, a man was racist to me today. I went into a bar to collect my gloves (which I left there yesterday), and the barmaid told me to come back during the day. Then a drunk, who (I think) had been making fun of my magnificent accent (every word flows beautifullly, like a mountain stream), told me to come back when I was Canadian. He was hassling the barmaid too, for being Irish. We were in an Irish bar, which seemed like an odd spot for a man who didn't like foreigners to go.

And class. It's an interesting topic; I read Watching the English by Kate Fox, which I think I've mentioned here before. One of her points was that class in the UK is more an inherited thing, or at least to do with behaviour, whereas in the US it's a straight up issue of who has the most money. It's perfectly feasible for an upper-class person to possess an ancient mansion full of antique furniture, but have barely anything to live on, and on the other end of the scale Richard Branson apparently identifies himself as working--class. Social mobility is tougher because class is based on what one inherits rather than what one earns. It's all about old money. But then, since it's not directly linked to actual wealth, I guess it's less important. All it seems to dictate is who looks down on who (the verdict of the book is that everybody looks down on the layer just below them, while the working and upper classes are actually strikingly similar in many ways).

Oh, wait. One more thing.

jvcc wrote:Do people listen to what footballers say or care what they do? They might, but my essential argument would be that they probably shouldn't.


It's not exactly the case that people do as the footballers say, but they're giant celebrities, and internationals in particular are representatives of their countries. The Premier League is a huge, worldwide English export, and things like the Suarez case create a very public negative image. When the league is as successful as it is, it can't avoid being key in driving public perception of the country it represents. And that it involved Liverpool and Manchester United, the two most decorated and most internationally-supported clubs, makes it all the more useless. Nobody thinks the Westboro Baptist Church has widespread support, but the damage they do to the public image of Christianity in the US isn't insignificant.

Back to sports, anyway. John Terry has a racism charge hanging over him, the FA dropped him as captain, Fabio Capello (then England manager) disagreed and resigned a few days ago. Does anyone have an opinion on this? Mine: Good decision by the FA; while of course detractors want to frame it as preemptive punishment before trial, I prefer the explanation that England, a nation famous for being undermined by tabloid gossip in the run-in to every major tournament, really don't need to feed the journalists any more than they can avoid. Some people want to make it out as a political decision, but it has sound football-based reasoning behind it. It's less that they're desperate to be seen as 'tough on racism' than that we won't be as good if he stays. Plus, they probably didn't mind giving Capello an excuse to leave, which is fine. The public verdict on this tournament seems to be 'might get out of the group stages', so a change of coach won't exactly tear anything down. It's just a shame that Harry Redknapp can't work for both Spurs and England (prediction: He'll take the England job, England will continue largely as they are (perhaps a little better for a few months), and in future seasons Spurs will be jockeying for fourth-to-sixth place).

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby ntw3001 » Mon Feb 13, 2012 12:55 am

Oh, Zambia won the African Cup of Nations. That's nice; I hoped they'd win because they were the underdogs.

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby jvcc » Mon Feb 13, 2012 1:31 am

ntw3001 wrote:Maybe it's an issue of national identity too; there are maple leaves everywhere here, whereas in the UK flying flags is seen as rather shamefully nationalist. I guess it's some grave political fear that encouraging British national identity might make foreign residents feel gravely discriminated against, but it actually seems to result in a complete absence of motivation for immigrant communities to become integrated. Politicians seemed to pick up on this a few years ago, but I'm not sure what their strategy was for actually solving it. I know they introduced 'citizenship' as a subject at school, but that was a clear replacement for the pointless 'general studies' class (which, probably due to deep-rooted problems with the UK education system, no school ever took seriously and students were largely expected to treat as a free period).

On QI they discussed the reverence that us Americans are known for having for our flag, and they--I think Stephen Fry--theorized that we invest so much in our flag as a symbol of our national identity because we don't have a royal family, which are apparently a more solid symbol in which to invest one's sense of citizenship. I'm not sure if it's true, but it's an interesting thought.

In regards to American anxiety regarding national identity, I've read a bit of early American literature and after the Revolutionary War writers had no idea how to define "America" or "Americans" as distinct from Britain or the British. We still spoke the same language and had the same customs, more or less, but no direct connection to the country (no real claim to the land or history there, etc.). American drama from the late 18th and early 19th century is hardly read anymore because it's all just rip-offs of what was going on in British theatre at the time. Novels from the same time period are all incredibly melodramatic and depressing (I read an interesting critical article which argued that the writers of those novels were mourning the death of the universal freedoms promised by the rhetoric of the Revolution, which failed to come to fruition for certain marginalized groups such as women or racial/ethnic minorities). It's not really until the Transcendentalists that you get an American literature that staunchly asserts itself as America, and only then because they fabricated a connection to the land of America by willing away the presence of Native Americans. I think in many ways America always has the looming shadow of doubt hanging over it that our claims to nationhood and a shared culture are loosely constructed and artificial, which is possibly why some people feel the need to shout the rhetoric of American Exceptionalism so loudly.

I'm sure I'm exaggerating and overly cynical and that you could say similar things about any country (I do think that all nations are just "imagined communities," anyway). But almost everyone my age I know isn't particularly patriotic and doesn't believe that there's any "American culture" to speak of. Did other generations of Americans feel that way? Perhaps it's because of the economic downturn.

ntw3001 wrote:And class. It's an interesting topic; I read Watching the English by Kate Fox, which I think I've mentioned here before. One of her points was that class in the UK is more an inherited thing, or at least to do with behaviour, whereas in the US it's a straight up issue of who has the most money. It's perfectly feasible for an upper-class person to possess an ancient mansion full of antique furniture, but have barely anything to live on, and on the other end of the scale Richard Branson apparently identifies himself as working--class. Social mobility is tougher because class is based on what one inherits rather than what one earns. It's all about old money. But then, since it's not directly linked to actual wealth, I guess it's less important. All it seems to dictate is who looks down on who (the verdict of the book is that everybody looks down on the layer just below them, while the working and upper classes are actually strikingly similar in many ways).

Oh, I was aware of the differing conceptions of class in America and Britain. I've had several professors impart this information to my fellow classmates and me as though it were quite amazing news. I think reading Victorian novels during those formative years when most young people are doing silly things like having social lives did a good job of preparing me for that bit of culture shock. British class is based on blood, American is based on money.

Relevant.

ntw3001 wrote:Back to sports, anyway.

No.
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby PonderThis » Mon Feb 13, 2012 12:20 pm

I protest this interesting discussion of racism clogging up our ME WANT DISCUSS SPORTS thread!! :x

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby ntw3001 » Mon Feb 13, 2012 7:35 pm

Sorry dude, you're going to have to start a new thread. This one is ours now.

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby Low-Tech » Mon Apr 09, 2012 3:46 am

Well, I know it's early, very early, to torture the metaphor, this baby of a baseball season isn't even dry yet, but.....

The Pirates are over .500, having taken 2 of 3 from the cross-state Phillies, both in dramatic walk-off fashion in the 9th inning

So yes, I'm happy for the moment
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby ntw3001 » Tue May 15, 2012 4:23 pm

This forum needs some posts.

So that was quite an eventful final day for the Premier League! It basically went how I wanted, except Arsenal finished third instead of fifth. Sure hope Chelsea can't beat Bayern Munich in the Champions League final (they can't).

So, I guess we have a transfer window to look at! I don't know. Probably not good news for Spurs, especially if Chelsea do win the Champions League (for reference: The CL is the top European league and the top four from the Premier League are eligible for entry. In the case that the current holders finish outside their league's CL positions, they take the final spot. That spot (4th) is occupied by Spurs, and will qualify them for a CL place only if Chelsea (finishing 6th in the PL) don't win the CL final this Satyrday). Sure hope they bad folks doesn't poach our mans!

Also: Chelmsford finished one place short of the playoffs. For shame!

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby MysticalDescent » Thu May 17, 2012 3:32 pm

ntw3001 wrote:This forum needs some posts.

So that was quite an eventful final day for the Premier League! It basically went how I wanted, except Arsenal finished third instead of fifth. Sure hope Chelsea can't beat Bayern Munich in the Champions League final (they can't).

So, I guess we have a transfer window to look at! I don't know. Probably not good news for Spurs, especially if Chelsea do win the Champions League (for reference: The CL is the top European league and the top four from the Premier League are eligible for entry. In the case that the current holders finish outside their league's CL positions, they take the final spot. That spot (4th) is occupied by Spurs, and will qualify them for a CL place only if Chelsea (finishing 6th in the PL) don't win the CL final this Satyrday). Sure hope they bad folks doesn't poach our mans!

Also: Chelmsford finished one place short of the playoffs. For shame!


Ooh, and Kenny Dalglish has been sacked, which gives me an excuse to put this here:

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby Low-Tech » Fri May 18, 2012 6:52 am

Speaking of soccer, I'm lucky that no major American sports league practices regulation/de-regulation of winning/losing teams, otherwise my Pirates would have been demoted to playing in a kid's T-ball league by now...........

On the bright side, they're still hovering around the .500 mark, which is good enough for 3rd place in the National League Central (aka Comedy Central)

Last night they had a no-hit bid going for 6 innings behind James McDonald (11 strikeouts, K'd 7 of the first 9 batters he faced before letting a guy get to base on a walk). They then choked a bit and had to settle for a 5-3 win instead. A feel-good win as opposed to those narrow one run escapes that feel more like luck, as in, you managed to carry a lit match across a gasoline-soaked room and NOT light the place on fire..... I'm convinced Joel Hanrahan's picture is in the Dictionary next to "Cardiac Arrest"
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby Judas Maccabeus » Fri May 18, 2012 6:59 am

Low-Tech wrote:On the bright side, they're still hovering around the .500 mark, which is good enough for 3rd place in the National League Central (aka Comedy Central)


Hi! We're in second here in Cincinnati, because everyone else is just that terrible (seriously, I think we'd be in like last place in the NL East :? ). Still, it's better than the American League Central... :P
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby ntw3001 » Fri May 18, 2012 9:18 am

Oh yeah and Southampton got promoted. My dad supports them, so pending tomorrow's CL final this may have turned out to be a pretty good season.

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby Low-Tech » Fri May 18, 2012 3:48 pm

Judas Maccabeus wrote:
Low-Tech wrote:On the bright side, they're still hovering around the .500 mark, which is good enough for 3rd place in the National League Central (aka Comedy Central)


Hi! We're in second here in Cincinnati, because everyone else is just that terrible (seriously, I think we'd be in like last place in the NL East :? ). Still, it's better than the American League Central... :P


It was always quite a feat that the Pirates often were the worst of the division, when the division had MORE teams in it than any other, and the Houston Astros won the division at least once with a winning percentage of like .505 ....

Went to see the Reds play the Pirates last year, good game, but we lost in the 9th. Though I still have a "winning record" at games I attend, which goes back to 1991 when, I was watching them play the Montreal Expos at Three Rivers.... neither of which EXIST anymore

The Expos moved to Washington and became the Nationals, who, interrestingly enough, we got the win against last night
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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby ntw3001 » Sat May 19, 2012 4:36 pm

Cgelsea if you don't concede a goal this instant I shall be furious

okay extra time go


nooooo

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Re: Hey, What About Those [Your Favorite Team]!

Postby chrismachine » Sat May 19, 2012 7:56 pm

There's really no way they should have won that...
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